Being Financially Stable

If saving for retirement is a struggle, imagine yourself if you lost a job. More and more people really take care of their own retirement security. To avoid unnecessary financial constraints, create a plan to reduce debt as you approach retirement. Design your savings and spending plans.

Retirement planning is definitely difficult, especially if the implications of your choices tend to get magnified. You’ll need to determine the amount of savings needed for your desired lifestyle. A spending strategy is equally important. However, rather than following a budget, many people spend more than what comes in.

Determine your annual base or mandatory expenses on food, clothing, shelter, utilities, medical, and transportation expenses. Also consider investing in long-term health care insurance which can typically cover the cost of home care, nursing-home care, and assisted living which is not usually covered by traditional health insurance.

Safeguarding your finances while you are still employed will help you become financially stable even after retirement. Many people are anxious when their retirement years are fast approaching. Imagine being at that point in your life and feeling you haven’t achieved your goals yet. It could get especially worrisome if you don’t have enough savings to be able to sustain your lifestyle after you retire. So, you need to enjoy spending within your means.

Securing a retirement fund is definitely needed if you want to live comfortably. The best time to start saving for your future is now. Not next year, not next week, not tomorrow, and not even later. Start planning for retirement at this very moment. It’s better to start sooner than later. The earlier you plan, the more time you have to save money, pay off debt, and invest in the future. You also give yourself some leg room in case you make a bad decision and need to recover from a mistake. If you start investing late, then you lower the possibility of accomplishing your retirement plans.

Consistency is essential in saving money for your retirement. At first, it may be difficult, but you’ll find it easier to save as you get along. One of the solutions for this is to set aside savings every month, even just a small amount. Save more as you go along-but never, never go below the initial savings amount.

Planning may be easy, but it’s the willingness and determination to stick to your plans that could bend at times. It’s important to have a clear vision ahead. No matter how far away your retirement years may seem, it is always a good idea to learn how to manage your personal finances. Those people who know how to manage their money succeed in allotting enough money not just for their savings but also for other financial matters.

It’s important to create a budget. Separate your needs from your wants and try to track your spending on a monthly basis by listing down all your expenses. Seeing where you spend your money can help you sort out your priorities and plan how you can save more from your income and spend less on non-important expenses.

Living Life After Retirement

If you’re thinking of new ways to enjoy your retirement, how about a vacation with your family and friends, or a quiet cruise through the inter-coastal. Have you considered multiple private yacht vacations? I know what you’re thinking. I can’t afford this or I don’t want the hassles of maintenance. Owning a Fractional yacht would solve both of these concerns making the yacht not only affordable but maintenance free.
Yachting can be exciting and fun for everyone, and spending time on a yacht has a way of bringing families together in a way that other trips may not be able to. One of the reasons children do not visit has to do with their busy schedules and the cost of travel when it come to bringing the whole family together. With a fractional yacht getting together with family becomes affordable for the whole family thus making traveling as a group a breeze.

With your own private yacht you can stop at different islands and dockside restaurants, enjoy some beach time, sunbathing onboard the yacht, sunset cruises, private dinners on your yacht, watch your grandkids have a blast onboard as they go snorkeling or jump off the swim platform.

I’m not saying purchase a yacht 100% to be able to enjoy one, purchase a fractional where you have equity, but no hassles of full ownership. A yacht share, allows you to partly own a yacht with other owners. Insurance is included, crew is included, all the maintenance is done for you and much more benefits.

Admittedly, you can rent a boat for such trips, however it does not give the full enjoyment and comfort that comes with owning one with familiar crew faces. There are so many advantages that comes with owning a fractional yacht. You’re not bothered about duration, you can decide to be on the sea as long as you desire, sleep on the yacht, you can purchase 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 12 weeks, in a nut shell purchase as many fractions as you will be realistically using.
For instance if you purchase 10% this will provide you with a month every year of usage and you do not need to use the whole month at one time you can spread it out into several days or weeks.

Yachting offers you all the amenities that make life comfortable. You have bedrooms, dinning rooms, kitchens, and a lot of deck room for some outside fun. Yachts come in different sizes, so there will always be one to fit your needs.
One good thing about yachting is that you get to ‘kill two birds with one stone’; You have fun, while bringing your families together, creating incredible memories. Best of all you walk onboard and enjoy the yacht walk off and let your crew look after all the maintenance. You see retirement is about finally getting to enjoy life without any work responsibilities and yes this means your yacht as well.

If you are partially retired a good number of business deals can be closed aboard a yacht. Maybe, you have a business associate you’ve been trying to get to talk about a project to no avail. Having them join you on a yacht can get them to loosen up and more likely to do the deal.

Gone are the days when owning a yacht is just for the super-rich. Fractional yacht ownership offers you the opportunity to own a yacht without worrying about having the full payment for the vessel. More so, you don’t get to worry about maintenance and repairs, as the management company takes care of everything for you.

Fractional ownership companies can handle everything from co-op yacht ownership to servicing, crew, insurance, and maintenance. You just get aboard your yacht with your family, friends or business partners anytime you feel like it and have fun.

Maintaining a yacht on your own can be very expensive, unless you can really afford it. Not being able to solely own a yacht doesn’t prevent you from enjoying the activity that comes with yachting. This is why a yacht share is a great option. The cost of everything is shared between you and your co-owners. With a fractional yacht your investment is a fraction and your maintenance is a fraction as you only pay for what use can realistically use. When ready to sell the yacht its much easier to sell a fraction than it is to sell a whole yacht and since you will have equity in the yacht you can sell it at any time to recover a portion of your money. Fractional companies allow you to charter your yacht so you can make money with your fraction-After all it is your yacht fraction!

Vacationing on a yacht can be a wonderful way to enjoy a family time together. Yachts come with anchors, so even when you’re not cruising around sightseeing, you can just anchor, and enjoy relaxing in the sun, having deck picnics, barbecues or playing games. More so, your yachting trip can include occasional stops to visit the local sights or restaurants.

In summary, if you are not ready for a retirement home, and you are ready to start enjoying life -Fractional yacht ownership may not only allow you to afford a yacht, it will help you bring your family together, keep your yacht ownership cost low, allow you to have equity, and explore wonderful places you may have never visited before such as: The British Virgin Islands, Exumas, New England, Leeward Islands, South Florida, Bimini Island, US Virgin Islands, Winward Islands and many more. Every year you can explore a new island! As one can see the possibilities are endless.

Don’t Make This Retirement Mistake

On the dashboard of my personal financial software, there’s a number.

Financial gurus tell me this number is one of the three most important in my life. One other is my credit score. The third is my age. (After all, I can shape the other two only if I’m still kicking.)

I certainly don’t measure myself against these numbers. Although I admit to paying a lot more attention to the age figure as it creeps up.

But other people use them to assess me, that’s for sure.

In fact, to hear some folks tell it, these little financial indicators are more important than a person’s morality, ethics or good works. (Particularly nasty are dating sites that require your credit score… the romantic in me says yuck to that.)

Age, credit score and… can you guess the other number? Do you know yours?

Above all, can you rely on its accuracy? What if it’s just a mirage?

You wouldn’t go out to sea without knowing precisely how much fuel, water, food and other essentials you had on board. After all, your life depends on it.

But there’s a good chance you’re heading into retirement with a faulty figure for your net worth…

Speculating on Your Future

Ever since I studied economics at university, the distinction between price and value has fascinated me.

Price is the amount of currency someone wants to part with for something at any moment in time.

$1.75 for a grande at Starbucks.

$299 for the latest video game console my daughter wants for Christmas.

Value is our subjective assessment of how useful something is. My daughter’s video game may cost $299, but I promise you, at that price there are many things I could use a lot more.

In markets, price is supposed to be an indicator of value. But prices have a way of becoming detached from value.

For example, a while back every kid wanted a silly little gadget that spins on your finger. For a few weeks they were selling for ridiculous prices because demand was so high. Once the kids figured out it was actually a boring little gimmick, the price dropped.

But trouble really starts when you introduce time into the price/value relationship. That’s where net worth comes in.

For example, right now I think my home will fetch a certain price. That price contributes a sizable chunk to my net worth. My net worth, in turn, is the foundation of my retirement plans.

I’m certain I could sell my home right now to one of the young families flooding into my neighborhood because of the good schools. They have the income to afford my price.

But I don’t plan to sell my house for another couple of decades at best. What if the young families of the future can’t afford my price?

What happens to my net worth then?

Beggar Thy Children

When we retire, we usually cash in the assets that make up our net worth, including our homes. For example, a couple I know recently sold their home and used the proceeds to acquire an assisted living apartment that will take care of them for as long as they live.

But if today’s younger generation can’t afford to buy our homes at the prices we use to measure our net worth, we may be stuck.

And it certainly looks as if the kids won’t be alright in 2037.

According to the Credit Suisse Research Institute’s global wealth report, if the world’s wealth were divided equally, each household would be worth $56,540.

But the top 1% own more than half of all wealth. The median household wealth is just $3,582. If you’re worth more than that, you’re in the richest 50% of the world’s population.

We can debate the reasons for this lopsided distribution of wealth. But there’s no debating the fact that people who reached adulthood since 2000 are on the losing end of it.

It’s particularly bad in the U.S.

On average, Americans between 30 and 39 have half as much wealth in 2017 as that age group had in 2007.

That means they will be significantly less well-off 10 to 20 years from now… unable to afford the sort of homes we take for granted today.

In other words, thanks to increasing inequality, you may be heading into retirement with faulty numbers.

Plan Your Future Around Value, Not Price

I constantly ask myself: What’s the Big Idea in my writing? What ties it all together?

As I wrote this article, it struck me that my Big Idea is the absolute importance of planning your future based on value, not price.

You know, for example, that you can’t rely on current stock prices to remain the same throughout your retirement. Converting stock holdings to other assets that tend to hold their value before stock prices fall is a key strategy.

Given what wealth inequality is doing to our younger generations, if you’re heading for retirement in the next couple of decades, you may want to consider the same strategy… when it comes to your home.